Life span and facts

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Siberian Huskies, with proper care, have a typical lifespan ranging from twelve to fifteen years. Health issues in the breed are mainly genetic such as seizures and defects of the eye (juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy). Hip dysplasia is not often found in this breed; however, as with many medium or larger-sized canines, it can occur. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals currently has the Siberian Husky ranked 148th out of a possible 153 breeds at risk for hip dysplasia, with only two percent of tested Siberian Huskies showing dysplasia. Siberian Huskies used for sled racing may also be prone to other ailments, such as gastric disease, bronchitis or bronchopulmonary ailments (“ski asthma”), and gastric erosions or ulcerations.

Sourced from Wikipedia

A black and white male Siberian Husky
Other names Chukcha, Chuksha
Nicknames Sibe, Husky
Country of origin Siberia, Russia
[hide]Traits
Weight Male 45–60 pounds (20–27 kg)
Female 35–50 pounds (16–23 kg)
Height Male 21–23.5 inches (53–60 cm)
Female 20–22 inches (51–56 cm)
Coat Thick double coat – thick undercoat and soft outer coat
Color All colors from black to white
Litter size 6–8 puppies[1]
Life span 12–15 years

The Siberian Husky (Russian: Сибирский хаски, Sibirskiy haski, “Siberian husky”) is a medium-size, wolf-like, dense-coat working dog breed that originated in eastern Siberia. The breed belongs to the Spitz genetic family. It is recognisable by its thickly furred double coat, sickle tail, erect triangular ears, and distinctive markings.

Huskies are an active, energetic, and resilient breed whose ancestors came from the extremely cold and harsh environment of the Siberian Arctic. Siberian Huskies were bred by the Chukchi of Northeastern Asia to pull heavy loads long distances through difficult conditions. The dogs were imported into Alaska during the Nome Gold Rush and later spread into the United States and Canada. They were initially sent to Alaska and Canada as sled dogs but rapidly acquired the status of family pets and show dogs.

2 thoughts on “Life span and facts”

  1. Thank you for sharing you experiences and knowledge of this beautiful breed. My second dog (Freya, G Shepard cross) passed away recently, and before her I owned a very handsome pure bred (Odin). I am now considering a Husky. Based on your views I think I’m sold!

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